Posts tagged ‘travel’

September 13, 2017

The revolution of travel

Why do we love to travel so much, and how can we get that same feeling of being “untethered and free on the road” in our day-to-day lives back home? Writer, director and former nomad Shebana Coelho has this to say on the topic — advice gleaned from a trip she took to Mongolia in 2007 and then shared in the short story “Snow in Mongolia,” published in The Best Women’s Travel Writing: Volume 10 (edited by Lavinia Spalding):

Mongolia changed everything — how I live, how I see the world, how I see myself. When you travel, you tend to cultivate a persona different from that of your everyday life. You’re open to everything, and you take better care of yourself emotionally. Because you know you’re out of your comfort zone, away from home, you work on letting go of whatever you can so that you can move with ease. . . .

At different points during my time in Mongolia, I remember thinking: one, what if I lived with the same persona I traveled with, and two, if I could manage here by planning only one step ahead instead of ten, instead of trying to see the whole road — well, couldn’t I manage my life like that too?

And that’s really what I’ve done since Mongolia — followed what calls. It’s led me . . . into a period of creativity that I would never have imagined for myself and that only came about because I was able to let go and fully follow what moves me. This has felt like a revolution. For me, it is.

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May 6, 2016

A journey of my own . . .

Thought of the day, courtesy of American author Henry Van Dyke:

Those who would see wonderful things must often be ready to travel alone.

Here’s to solo excursions, and the special physical places and mental spaces they can take you.

November 11, 2015

The right track means no backwards glances

Thought of the moment, source unknown:

You know you’re on the right track when you become uninterested in looking back.

Let the past be. Stop trying to be the person you once were.

Live like the person you are today, with joy, confidence and enthusiasm for what lies ahead. ❤

July 3, 2015

“Take up your bed. Go! Walk again!”

Ever get the urge to set out on a journey of exploration, to watch new horizons and new adventures unfurl before you? This wonderful quote about the pull of travel was written by Isobel Wylie Hutchison (1889-1982), Arctic wayfarer and botanist, in her excellent travelogue North to the Rime-Ringed Sun:

It’s strange that though my lines are set so fair and pleasant here [at home],
Yet every now and then there comes this whisper through the year —
“Take up your bed. Go! Walk again! Oh man! Your days are few,
And lo! The earth is very wide, her treasure waits for you.”

February 2, 2015

A handful of spaghetti is what we drive on . . .

A great quote from author Chris Czajkowski about the roads in South America. If you’ve ever been there and seen them, you know!

The roads were incredible. Imagine standing on a high point, chopping up a handful of spaghetti and flinging it over a mountainous landscape. A tiny little curved piece would land here, another there, still another way over there. Somehow, all these bits of road would be laboriously joined together. It would take hours to climb or descend four or five thousand metres.

A cleverly accurate description of a terrain (and road system) that must be seen to be believed!

(Source: And the River Still Sings by Chris Czajkowski, Caitlin Press, Halfmoon Bay BC, 2014.)

In memory of Anita M., who loved to travel but ended her journey far too early.
Miss you.

November 2, 2014

Live surrounded by light

Thought for the day, from my Yogi Tea bag:

Live light,
travel light,
spread the light,
be the light.

September 18, 2014

Destination (un)known

Thought for the day, courtesy of explorer Christopher Columbus:

You can never cross the ocean until you have the courage to lose sight of the shore.

Sometimes you just gotta jump on the boat and go.

December 11, 2013

You have to be lost to be found

The following passage comes from Rachel Friedman’s travel memoir The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost. Friedman wrote her words in the context of travel, but I think they apply to other areas of life, too:

What happens when we lose the things that anchor us? What if, instead of grasping at something to hold on to, we pull up our roots and walk away? Instead of trying to find the way back, we walk deeper and deeper into the woods, willing ourselves to get lost. In this place where nothing is recognizable, not the people or the language or the food, we are truly on our own. Eventually, we find ourselves unencumbered by the past or the future. Here is a fleeting glimpse of our truest self, our self in the present moment. After that, maybe we can finally go home — or maybe not.

Sometimes life requires us to get lost before we are truly found. Sometimes the “losing of our path” happens unexpectedly, without our input or intent, while other times we are the ones who purposely throw away the map and stride off into the unknown. Whatever the case, such instances provide us with the unique opportunity to live outside our “normal routines” for a time. In those strange places of initial discomfort, we often encounter aspects of ourselves that don’t typically show their faces in our day-to-day lives. Sometimes those aspects empower us, sometimes they unsettle us, and sometimes they just confuse us. But unearthing them is important, as each one of them gives us a more complete picture of who we truly are — and a better position from which to determine the kind of life we really want to lead.

So, every once in a while, give yourself permission to get lost. You never know just what you might find . . . .

October 5, 2013

YOU are wonder-full

Something to think about . . . 

People go abroad to wonder at the heights of mountains, at the huge waves of the sea, at the long courses of rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars; and they pass by themselves without wondering. 
~  Saint Augustin

September 27, 2013

Book Recommendation — “Have Mother, Will Travel” by Claire and Mia Fontaine

It’s a book for women of all kinds, but it’s especially a book for mothers and daughters seeking insight into their own relationships. In Have Mother, Will Travel, mother-daughter (and author) duo Claire and Mia Fontaine embark on a four-month journey around the world together. The ultimate goal of their trip is to revive their flagging relationship, but along the way, 51-year-old Claire and 25-year-old Mia gain fresh insight into their own life journeys, as well as new appreciation for what they each have to offer — to themselves, to each other and to the world. Well-written, funny and very reflective, this book is definitely worth picking up!

havemother-final-cover

“Have Mother, Will Travel: A Mother and Daughter Discover Themselves, Each Other, and the World” by Claire and Mia Fontaine

Here are a few of my favourite quotes from the book:

I’ve become very clear that finding my way forward in life isn’t going to come from figuring out what I want to do, but by staying grounded in the person doing the wanting. The very core of my being, my essential, authentic, whatever-you-call-it self, never has any trouble knowing what she wants, and certainly never worries about how she’s going to get it. (Claire Fontaine)

Sometimes I wonder if we make big moves because we underestimate the importance of smaller ones. Years are just an accumulation of thousands of hours, and what we choose to do with each of them matters. (Mia Fontaine)

Adulthood isn’t a destination, it’s a process, and, as women, we are always coming of age. (Mia Fontaine)

There are some advantages to stumbling around lost for a while. It allows for discovery. (Claire Fontaine)

Change happens in the small moments, when a sliver of light finds its way through the cracks. (Claire Fontaine)

All relationships happen in stages, with varying depths, multiple layers. You invariably reach a point where you hit the ceiling of a certain level of intimacy and then have the option of staying there — which risks the relationship becoming predictable or stale — or you can take it to the next level. (Mia Fontaine)