Posts tagged ‘presence’

March 18, 2016

Hold “home” with longer arms

So many people feel alone and isolated in today’s Western society, where cavernous, echoing homes; drive-through meals; and tiny, emoticon-filled cell phone screens dominate.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Tiny house builder Dee Williams suggests that if we take the chance to reach out to the people and places around us — to interact in person, face-to-face, in ways that let us look into each others’ eyes, feel the sun on our skin, and exchange a smile, touch or hug — we might all feel a stronger sense of belonging in this world. Williams writes in her memoir The Big Tiny:

If more people understood how nice it is to have a sense of home that extends past our locked doors, past our neighbours’ padlocks, to the local food co-op and library, the sidewalks busted up by old trees — if we all hold home with longer arms — we’d live in a very different place. . . .

We wouldn’t feel so alone, no matter the size of our houses, no matter whether we had good health or [not]. We would begin to see the each moment presents an opportunity to relax, to notice that the wind has shifted and a storm is coming, or that our friend’s toddler has decided to wear dinner instead of eating it. We would see that each minute counts for something timeless and, if we want, we can all find our way inside these big, tiny moments.

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April 13, 2015

Live in the sunlight

Thought of the moment, courtesy of American daredevil Evel Knievel:

I decided to fly through the air and live in the sunlight and enjoy life as much as I could.

I good motto for any life, I’d say.

March 22, 2015

Just BREATHE . . .

BREATHE . . . .

Be in the moment.
Realistic goals – set ’em.
Everyday events – notice ’em.
Acts of kindness – do ’em!
Turn around the negatives.
Honour your strengths.
Each day with gratitude.

BREATHE . . . .

🙂

(Source: http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/just-breathe.html) 

October 14, 2014

Stop, and immerse yourself in an unforgettable experience

Thought for the day, courtesy of artist and author Frederick Franck:

In this twentieth century, to stop rushing around, to sit quietly on the grass, to switch off the world and come back to earth, to allow the eye to see a willow, a bush, a cloud, a leaf, is an unforgettable experience.

At least one time this week, give yourself an unforgettable experience.

June 11, 2014

The mystery of your moment

Alix Kates Shulman writes in her memoir Drinking the Rain:

Within walking distance of any spot on Earth there’s probably more than enough mystery to investigate in a lifetime.

In other words, be present to the sights, sounds and sensations that shine in your immediate surroundings. What may seem like your normal “mundane” is home to untold wonders, if only you open yourself to look.

May 31, 2014

A stillness that unmasks

Thought for the last day of May, courtesy of Franz Kafka:

You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait. Do not even wait, be quite still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.

Be open to the rolling. Welcome it with joy.

 

February 5, 2014

Don’t be fooled; live for today

Here’s a great quote from Japanese Buddhist Ishin Yoshimoto about living in the present:

You are fooled by your mind into believing there is tomorrow, so you may waste today.

Don’t waste today, live it. You never know when your last tomorrow will be today.

January 28, 2014

Live your future every day

Thought for the day, from American writer Margaret Bonanno:

It is only possible to live happily ever after on a day-to-day basis.

Cheers to that. Now let’s live it.

January 1, 2014

January challenge: Become a wild child!

This month’s challenge is inspired by the lyrics from the song “Wild Child” by Enya. Your goal is to start the year off by trying to be completely present to as many of the events, experiences and sensations swirling around you as possible. Take an hour, a morning or a day — or several days! — and give in to the magic of it all. Big or small, loud or quiet, every moment has much to offer, if you give yourself over to it. Even the rain can glimmer with beauty and joy; just look with an open heart.

Best wishes for 2014!

Ever close your eyes?
Ever stop and listen?
Ever feel alive?
And you’ve nothing missing
You don’t need a reason
Let the day go on and on.

Let the rain fall down
Everywhere around you
Give into it now
Let the day surround you
You don’t need a reason
Let the rain go on and on. . . .

Only take the time
From the helter-skelter
Every day you find
Everything’s in kilter
You don’t need a reason
Let the day go on and on.

Every summer sun
Every winter evening
Every spring to come
Every autumn leaving
You don’t need a reason
Let it all go on and on.

What a day, what a day, to take to
What a way, what a way, to make it through
What a day, what a day, to take to
A wild child.

December 11, 2013

You have to be lost to be found

The following passage comes from Rachel Friedman’s travel memoir The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost. Friedman wrote her words in the context of travel, but I think they apply to other areas of life, too:

What happens when we lose the things that anchor us? What if, instead of grasping at something to hold on to, we pull up our roots and walk away? Instead of trying to find the way back, we walk deeper and deeper into the woods, willing ourselves to get lost. In this place where nothing is recognizable, not the people or the language or the food, we are truly on our own. Eventually, we find ourselves unencumbered by the past or the future. Here is a fleeting glimpse of our truest self, our self in the present moment. After that, maybe we can finally go home — or maybe not.

Sometimes life requires us to get lost before we are truly found. Sometimes the “losing of our path” happens unexpectedly, without our input or intent, while other times we are the ones who purposely throw away the map and stride off into the unknown. Whatever the case, such instances provide us with the unique opportunity to live outside our “normal routines” for a time. In those strange places of initial discomfort, we often encounter aspects of ourselves that don’t typically show their faces in our day-to-day lives. Sometimes those aspects empower us, sometimes they unsettle us, and sometimes they just confuse us. But unearthing them is important, as each one of them gives us a more complete picture of who we truly are — and a better position from which to determine the kind of life we really want to lead.

So, every once in a while, give yourself permission to get lost. You never know just what you might find . . . .