Posts tagged ‘past’

November 20, 2015

Exit anger, enter love

Thought of the moment, courtesy of author Barbara De Angelis:

The more anger towards the past you carry in your heart, the less capable you are of loving in the present.

I do think that some of the events in my past have led me to direct anger towards people or situations that I see as the “cause” of something bad or undesirable in my life. Often it’s a subconscious reaction, one that I’m not aware of (or aware of the depth of) until years later. I know that these events and people don’t actually “cause” my negative reaction; how I choose to react to any situation is completely up to me — but tell that to my heart in the moment!!

The anger is there, I know it’s there, and I’m trying to work my way through it, to move towards a place of acceptance, forgiveness, freedom. And, yes, the ability to love and truly live in the present once again.

Awareness, I’ve always said, is the first step towards change.

Peace.

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October 25, 2013

Into the great wide open (of your future!)

Have you ever made a decision about what to do or how to act based on what happened during a similar instance in your past? If you got hurt years ago, do you now avoid similar situations for fear of getting hurt again? If you failed (or succeeded) once, do you expect the same results the next time you try? Or do you simply stop trying, because doing so seems easier (and safer) than taking a risk and putting yourself out there?

We’ve all entertained these kinds of thoughts. But guess what? They’re not helping us.

The past is the past, and history rarely repeats itself. If you got hurt once, that’s fine. But you are a strong, capable person, and you don’t follow any patterns. With new acquaintances, the passing of time and your own personal growth factored in, it’s unlikely that you’ll experience the same result twice.

As for fear of failure, hardly anyone succeeds at anything the first time they try. The successful person is the one who tries anyway, again and again — and willingly makes mistakes — because what they’re doing is something they love, and they want to learn, or grow, or laugh, or challenge themselves in some way.

It’s time to rid yourself of the belief that your past defines your future. Your old experiences may have shaped the person you are today, but they have absolutely no bearing on where you go from here — unless you like the idea of moving through life wearing blinders that rob you of all the wonderful experiences and opportunities waiting for you in your peripheral vision.

In the end, nothing defines your future better than you do. Toss aside those old limiting perspectives — those blinders — and watch your path open up before you.

In the words of late author and motivational speaker Keith D. Harrell:

What has happened is not nearly as important as what can happen. Look to the possibilities of your future for direction, forsaking the burdensome limitations of your past.

Your future really is wide open. All that remains is for you to see that.  ♥

September 24, 2013

Calendar girl

I love this verse from the song Calendar Girl by the Canadian band Stars:

I can’t live forever
I can’t always be
One day I’ll be sand on a beach by the sea
The pages keep turning
I’ll mark off each day with a cross
And I’ll laugh about all that we’ve lost.

March 24, 2013

Love the shadow to love the light

A bit of wisdom from my bag of Yogi Tea:

Love what is ahead by loving what has come before.

To me, this quote suggests that a key to living with contentment — both now and in the future — is the ability to acknowledge and accept all that has happened to you in the past — both the good moments and the bad ones.  “Love what has come before,” even if what has come before is nasty or painful or seems impossible to love.

If your past is anything like mine, it’s no rose garden.  Granted, there have been wonderful moments — plenty of them — but I’ve also experienced difficult and tumultuous times, stormy times filled with hurt and loss, times that have tripped me up, beaten me down and left a few scars to prove it.

Yet if I can learn to love those dark moments as much as I do the light — if I can make peace with them instead of trying to erase them from memory; if I can resolve past hurts and injustices inside myself and then let them go; if I can acknowledge and accept every bit of my past as a vital and worthy part of the person I am now — then I can enter my future with a free and open heart.  I can walk forward unburdened, alive to what is happening around me.  And I can welcome what will come with grace and compassion.

I’m willing to give it a try.  You?

December 14, 2012

The path to your future is waiting

A wonderful quote for today, I think…

When embarking on any path, we erase footprints behind us in order to move forward.
~  Terrie M. Williams in The Odyssey of KP2:  An Orphan Seal, a Marine Biologist, and the Fight to Save a Species

Travel well.

November 2, 2012

Children. . . . The future of our past

My children are the future of my past.

These words come from Alyce Johnson, a professor of First Nations Studies at the University of Northern British Columbia and a member of the Kluane First Nation in Yukon.  She shared them yesterday as she led a group of six women on a “trail talk” along the trails of Forests for the World, a park and demonstration forest in Prince George, B.C.

Alyce spoke to our small group, of which I was a member, about how trails — whether “natural” or “man-made” — carry knowledge of people, landscapes and traditions, and help define languages, narratives and, ultimately, world views.

To me, Alyce’s words drive home the importance of immersing our children in the stories, protocols and traditions of our families, our people, our communities, our earth.  The past (and our cultural histories) cannot be integrated into the future unless carried there by our young ones.  We must therefore equip our children well for the task.

I also love this beautiful quote from a handout Alyce provided during the walk:

I am a map of a storied world expressed from a language that the earth remembers and a people speak.

The Earth remembers, a people speak, and we are one.

(The “Trail Talk” I attended was one of a series organized by the University of Northern British Columbia’s Northern Research Group.)