Posts tagged ‘optimism’

October 7, 2015

Believe in the impossible

Thought of the day, courtesy of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland:

Alice laughed: “There’s no use trying,” she said; “one can’t believe impossible things.”
“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was younger, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Space travel, air travel, the Internet –even you running that 5-kilometre course without stopping once.

Some of the biggest breakthroughs in our modern age were once thought impossible.

Believe in the impossible.¬†Give those “crazy” ideas wings to fly.

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August 31, 2015

Observed on the street: A little G.O.O.D. advice

I came across this wonderful quote outside the Alternative Grounds Coffee and Tea House in Burns Lake, British Columbia:

20150831_GOODAdvice

 

Never give up, because F.A.I.L. means “First Attempt in Learning.”
END is not the end; in fact, E.N.D. means “Effort Never Dies.”
If you get NO as an answer, just remember, N.O. means “Next Opportunity.”
Be positive! ūüôā

May 7, 2015

A note about what’s most important

A great quote from Vickie M. Worsham:

Remember what is most important:

It’s not having everything go right;
it’s facing whatever goes wrong.
It’s not being without fear;
it’s having the determination to go on in spite of it.
It’s not where you stand,
but the direction you’re going in.

Remember to live this one day and not add tomorrow’s troubles to today’s load.
Remember that every day ends and brings a new tomorrow full of exciting new things.
Love what you do,
do the best you can,
and always remember how much you are loved.

April 13, 2015

Live in the sunlight

Thought of the moment, courtesy of American daredevil Evel Knievel:

I decided to fly through the air and live in the sunlight and enjoy life as much as I could.

I good motto for any life, I’d say.

December 18, 2013

You are (always) unwritten

Great lyrics from Natasha Bedingfield’s song “Unwritten” — reminding us that, at any time in our lives, we have the option to turn over a new leaf, turn to a blank page, and start afresh . . . and to embrace that experience as it unfolds before us.

I am unwritten
Can’t read my mind
I’m undefined
I’m just beginning
The pen’s in my hand
Ending unplanned

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find
Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions

Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else
No one else can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where you book begins
The rest is still unwritten

November 22, 2013

Observed on the street: Back-cover inspiration for a front-page life

I found this fabulous and uplifting “manifesto for life” on the back cover of this month’s alive magazine:

Celebrate life. Learn lots.
Love what you do.
And always be curious for more.
Be the adventurer of your own dreams.
Aim high. Higher.
Choose to be healthy and happy inside and out.
Be your best. Inspire others. It’s contagious.
Be fearless.
Discover your purpose then make it happen.
Go beyond your wildest dreams.
Do stuff that matters. Do it right.
Stop at nothing to create, evolve. Be smarter. Nourish and heal.
Have an open mind. Listen. Really listen.
Defeat the naysayers. Dare yourself daily.
Defy the ordinary.
Respect everyone and everything.
Take care. Of yourself, each other, the planet.
Laugh with abandon.
Love whole-heartedly and spread joy.
And above all
Live your life in BOLD. 

(Courtesy Genuine Health: www.genuinehealth.com/our-story/genuine-health-manifesto)

October 25, 2013

Into the great wide open (of your future!)

Have you ever made a decision about what to do or how to act based on what happened during a similar instance in your past? If you got hurt years ago, do you now avoid similar situations for fear of getting hurt again? If you failed (or succeeded) once, do you expect the same results the next time you try? Or do you simply stop trying, because doing so seems easier (and safer) than taking a risk and putting yourself out there?

We’ve all entertained these kinds of thoughts. But guess what? They’re not helping us.

The past is the past, and history rarely repeats itself. If you got hurt once, that’s fine. But you are a strong, capable person, and you don’t follow any patterns. With new acquaintances, the passing of time and your own personal growth factored in, it’s unlikely that you’ll experience the same result twice.

As for fear of failure, hardly anyone succeeds at anything the first time they try. The successful person is the one who¬†tries anyway, again and again — and¬†willingly makes mistakes — because what they’re doing is something they love, and they want to learn, or grow, or laugh, or challenge themselves in some way.

It’s time to rid yourself of the belief that your past defines your future. Your old experiences may have shaped the person you are today, but they have absolutely no bearing on where you go from here — unless you like the idea of moving through life wearing blinders that rob you of all the wonderful experiences and opportunities waiting for you in your peripheral vision.

In the end, nothing defines your future better than you do. Toss aside those old limiting perspectives — those blinders — and watch your path open up before you.

In the words of late author and motivational speaker Keith D. Harrell:

What has happened is not nearly as important as what can happen. Look to the possibilities of your future for direction, forsaking the burdensome limitations of your past.

Your future really is wide open. All that remains is for you to see that.  ♥

October 3, 2013

I choose . . .

I can either spend my time worrying about what might happen in the future, or I can choose to enjoy the gifts that are in my life right now, in this very moment.

The choice is mine — and yours. ¬†Every day.

July 14, 2013

In every crisis lies an opportunity

An encouraging quote from Canadian journalist Jan Wong:

In Chinese, the word for crisis is wei ji, composed of the character wei, which means danger, and ji, which means opportunity.

Danger and opportunity: joined hand-in-hand, one beside the other, in every crisis you face.

The next time you find yourself in a tough spot, remember that the potential for growth lies somewhere within the mess before you. Big or small, the opening is there. Look for it. Then grasp it tight and follow it home.