Posts tagged ‘emotion’

November 20, 2015

Exit anger, enter love

Thought of the moment, courtesy of author Barbara De Angelis:

The more anger towards the past you carry in your heart, the less capable you are of loving in the present.

I do think that some of the events in my past have led me to direct anger towards people or situations that I see as the “cause” of something bad or undesirable in my life. Often it’s a subconscious reaction, one that I’m not aware of (or aware of the depth of) until years later. I know that these events and people don’t actually “cause” my negative reaction; how I choose to react to any situation is completely up to me — but tell that to my heart in the moment!!

The anger is there, I know it’s there, and I’m trying to work my way through it, to move towards a place of acceptance, forgiveness, freedom. And, yes, the ability to love and truly live in the present once again.

Awareness, I’ve always said, is the first step towards change.

Peace.

September 8, 2014

This full moon, return to yourself

On the eve of the 2014 harvest moon — also a supermoon — I share the lyrics from the song “Return to Innocence” by Enigma.

In this life, follow your heart, and don’t be afraid to take a risk or two. Be well.

Don’t be afraid to be weak.
Don’t be too proud to be strong.
Just look into your heart, my friend;
That will be the return to yourself:
The return to innocence.

If you want, then start to laugh.
If you must, then start to cry.
Be yourself; don’t hide.
Just believe in destiny.
Don’t care what people say.
Just follow your own way.
Don’t give up and lose the chance
To return to innocence.

March 11, 2014

Lessons from a Russian doctor: A metaphor for life in general

In Boris Pasternak’s classic novel Doctor Zhivago, Yuri Zhivago says to Lara Antipova:

I don’t think I could love you so much if you had nothing to complain of and nothing to regret. I don’t like people who have never fallen or stumbled. Their virtue is lifeless and of little value. Life hasn’t revealed its beauty to them.

I think this is a fitting metaphor for life in general: if you haven’t encountered and overcome challenges, setbacks or failures in your life; if you don’t have old scars that have healed with time, or wounds that are healing right now; if you haven’t faced difficult decisions and simply done your best to navigate those moments with as few bumps as possible, then I think you are missing out on the richness of experience and emotion that life has to offer. And in this experience and emotion is where the true beauty of life lies — or at least where you learn to see that beauty, in comparison to what has come before.

November 30, 2013

Book Recommendation – “Finding Jim” by Susan Oakey-Baker

On April 30, 1999, Susan Oakey-Baker lost her mountaineer husband, Jim Haberl, to an avalanche on Mount Ultima Thule, Alaska. Finding Jim is Oakey-Baker’s incredibly candid story of her journey through the grief that followed. Oakey-Baker hides nothing about the intensity of her struggles to make sense of the tragedy and “do well” in the aftermath. Her writing is honest, unapologetic and deeply poignant, the emotions sometimes so raw and present that they seem to well up from within your own body. If you have ever “lost” a loved one (in any sense of the word), this book will speak to aspects of your experience. Oakey-Baker has bravely put herself “out there” in a way most people don’t, and the result is an intensely beautiful testament to both the messy complexity of human feeling, and the resilience within each of us to finally accept and move on.

Cover image of the book "Finding Jim" by Susan Oakey-Baker

“Finding Jim” by Susan Oakey-Baker

August 9, 2013

What would happen today?

What would happen today if I . . .

–  did the thing that scares me,
–  said what I really think,
–  told someone I love them,
–  stood up for what I believe in,
–  honoured my true feelings,
–  acted from my heart?

What, indeed.

April 29, 2013

Heartbreak – a journey (in three quotes)

Heartbreak: a journey (in three quotes):

The breaking of so great a thing
should make a greater crack.
(William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra)

She took a step and didn’t want to take any more,
but she did.
(Markus Zusak, The Book Thief)

Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness.
It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift.
(Mary Oliver)

April 9, 2013

What do you need right now?

Another beautiful passage from Kelly Winters’ book Walking Home:  A Woman’s Pilgrimage on the Appalachian Trail:

What do I need now?  I wonder.  To live and feel and sense deeply, to fill up on experiences and emotions and events, to be open to newness and to people, to lose any masks I wear, to lighten my load — physically, emotionally and spiritually — to laugh, to sing, to commune.

An excellent set of guideposts by which set life’s compass, don’t you think?