Posts tagged ‘connection’

December 31, 2015

A post to end 2015: click

I came upon this wonderful quote today, and it made me think of all the people — new acquaintances and old friends — who have truly touched my life through their presence, spirit, conversation, laughter, support, ideas, shoulders or ears (to lean on or listen), unconditional love or what have you:

Sometimes you meet someone, and it’s so clear that the two of you, on some level, belong together. As lovers, or as friends, or as family, or as something entirely different. You just work, whether you understand one another, or you’re in love, or you’re partners in crime. You meet these people throughout your life, out of nowhere, under the strangest circumstances, and they help you feel alive. (Source unknown)

To all of you who truly “click” with me and make me feel alive, thank you. I am blessed to have you in my life and to call you my friends.

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November 10, 2015

Brokenness connects us

Thought of the moment, courtesy of vocalist and author Sheila Walsh:

My brokenness is a better bridge for people than my pretend wholeness ever was.

Think about it: it’s not your perfection, but your imperfection that allows people to truly connect with you. As humans, we all have cracks and fissures, chips and patches, and we feel reassured and relieved when we learn that others have them, too. Sharing our vulnerabilities, fears and foibles with others often allows us to build deeper, more intimate relationships. We can identify, emotionally, with people who aren’t shiny and perfect, and we’re much more inclined to share our own personal experiences with people who we know have faced similar struggles.

Feigning perfection — putting up a false front that always proclaims “I’m fine; everything in my life is/was/will be great!” — is more of a wall to connecting with others than sharing your faults and failings ever would be.

April 2, 2014

The power of touch runs deep

Following on the theme of yesterday’s post — my April challenge to reach out and touch someone (new) — here are a few quotes that highlight the power of touch in our lives:

‘Tis the human touch in the world that counts — the touch of your hand and mine — which means far more to the sinking heart than shelter or bread or wine. For shelter is gone when the night is o’er, and bread lasts only a day. But the touch of the hand and the sound of the voice live on in the soul always.
(Spencer M. Free)

Yes I am a strong person, but every now and then I also need someone to take my hand and say everything will be OK.
(Anonymous)

Everybody needs a hug. It changes your metabolism
(Leo Buscaglia)

The things that matter most in our lives are not fantastic or grand. They are the moments when we touch each other.
(Jack Kornfield)

April 1, 2014

April challenge: Reach out and touch someone (new)

I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.
(Maya Angelou)

This April, I challenge you to reach out and make physical contact with someone whom you have never touched before. It could be a hand on the arm or the knee, a hug or a high five, a playful pinch in the ribs — whatever suits the moment, your comfort level and your inclination.

Physical contact with other human beings is vital our health and well-being; it is fundamental to our senses of worth and connection and belonging in the world. Yet we often undervalue our tactile senses — or discount them altogether — in our “modern-day” dealings with other people.

This month, make an effort to change that. Bring physical touch back, and see how good it makes you (and others) feel.

December 11, 2013

You have to be lost to be found

The following passage comes from Rachel Friedman’s travel memoir The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost. Friedman wrote her words in the context of travel, but I think they apply to other areas of life, too:

What happens when we lose the things that anchor us? What if, instead of grasping at something to hold on to, we pull up our roots and walk away? Instead of trying to find the way back, we walk deeper and deeper into the woods, willing ourselves to get lost. In this place where nothing is recognizable, not the people or the language or the food, we are truly on our own. Eventually, we find ourselves unencumbered by the past or the future. Here is a fleeting glimpse of our truest self, our self in the present moment. After that, maybe we can finally go home — or maybe not.

Sometimes life requires us to get lost before we are truly found. Sometimes the “losing of our path” happens unexpectedly, without our input or intent, while other times we are the ones who purposely throw away the map and stride off into the unknown. Whatever the case, such instances provide us with the unique opportunity to live outside our “normal routines” for a time. In those strange places of initial discomfort, we often encounter aspects of ourselves that don’t typically show their faces in our day-to-day lives. Sometimes those aspects empower us, sometimes they unsettle us, and sometimes they just confuse us. But unearthing them is important, as each one of them gives us a more complete picture of who we truly are — and a better position from which to determine the kind of life we really want to lead.

So, every once in a while, give yourself permission to get lost. You never know just what you might find . . . .

April 29, 2013

Observed on the street: A circle of life, turning, turning

I came across this beautiful rendition of the aboriginal medicine wheel (also called the wheel of life or the sacred hoop) on the outer wall of my local/district community arts council building:

wheel_of_life

 

I love the grounding stones at centre; the depiction of the cycles of nature, the seasons, the sun; the symbolism of birth, growth, death and rebirth — of life itself.  I love how the prints of humans and animals exist together in the soil, intermingled with the roots of the trees, connected to both the seeds of life and the earth to which all living things eventually return.  I love how each component of the circle relies on every other for balance, for continuity, for solidity, for completeness.

We are all one, forever united in the loop of this enduring narrative.  We share the same history; we share the same future.  Let’s take care of one another the best we can.  Peace.