Posts tagged ‘birth’

July 14, 2017

Where babies come from

I love this description of “where babies come from,” courtesy of Montreal author Heather O’Neill in her short story of the same name in her larger anthology Daydreams of Angels. Read this woman’s work if you have the chance — it is pure magic.

Back when I was a girl, babies were washed up from the ocean when the tide went out. You would see their little bottoms peeking up from out of the sand, and if you dug them up quickly, they would be yours to keep. You had to wake up and get to the beach very, very early if you wanted a baby, because there were always loads of girls at the seashore looking for them. . . .  Once the sun went down and the tide came back in, the babies were loosened from the sand and were swept back out to sea. Then it was pretty much all over and you had to go home empty-handed.

Advertisements
November 25, 2014

“Rebirth is a resource of life”

In Carol Drinkwater’s memoir The Olive Farm, she and her partner wait out a week of heavy rains inside their ramshackle old villa on their olive farm in the south of France. When the skies finally clear, Drinkwater walks her terraces to take stock of the damage and – to her surprise – the rejuvenation that now mark the land. One particular sight takes her breath away:

The orange trees, dead as mummies when we bought the house [a year ago] and which we have watched creeping back to life throughout the summer months, are now sharp, five feet tall, brilliant green spheres of life. And, what is more miraculous to me, they are laden with round green balls. Minuscule oranges.

Such renascence hardly seems possible. I close my eyes. I store that fact that rebirth is a resource of life. . . . Some creeping shadow warns me that I will need to keep it in mind.

Rebirth is a resource of life. How beautiful and how true. The earth is resilient. Nature is resilient. We are resilient. Even from a point of hopelessness, from an appearance of atrophy or extinction, we can bounce back to health and brilliance. All that is needed are time and proper care.

Never give up on anything, or anyone. Never judge a landscape, or a person, by its outward appearance. What lies beneath and within is a dazzling energy that may soon burst forth again.

April 29, 2013

Observed on the street: A circle of life, turning, turning

I came across this beautiful rendition of the aboriginal medicine wheel (also called the wheel of life or the sacred hoop) on the outer wall of my local/district community arts council building:

wheel_of_life

 

I love the grounding stones at centre; the depiction of the cycles of nature, the seasons, the sun; the symbolism of birth, growth, death and rebirth — of life itself.  I love how the prints of humans and animals exist together in the soil, intermingled with the roots of the trees, connected to both the seeds of life and the earth to which all living things eventually return.  I love how each component of the circle relies on every other for balance, for continuity, for solidity, for completeness.

We are all one, forever united in the loop of this enduring narrative.  We share the same history; we share the same future.  Let’s take care of one another the best we can.  Peace.