Archive for August, 2014

August 30, 2014

Credo for a life well lived

At the end of her memoir The Second Journey, author Joan Anderson shares a list of personal guidelines that she wrote to remind herself how to remain grounded, present and open to continual growth in today’s over-busy, over-achieving society. Consider the list a permission slip of sorts: YOU have the right to these things, too!

Embrace change — knowing that life is always being reconfigured.
Befriend the person you are striving to become.
Welcome new paths. Enjoy the detours.
Strive to go deeper rather than just forward.
Know that most unnecessary demands come from the unfinished parts of self.
Beware of speed. It is often one’s undoing.
Wholehearted is the way. Half-hearted will kill you.
Harness your evolvement.
Let go of what is outlived to make room for the unlived.

If I have learned nothing else, it is that the journey [of life, of self] will always be unfinished.

August 26, 2014

Be patient, my dear, for the light will shine again

Thought for the moment, courtesy of Joan Anderson’s memoir The Second Journey:

Nothing worthwhile can be hurried — not the seasons, not birth or death, the coming of day, the moving into night; not a composition, a thought, a work of art, the form of a story. Patience is what makes each experience meaningful. Finding the time to be patient is what makes a life well lived.

Sometimes life hands you some real “lemons” of a moment. All you can do during these trying times is trust that the cycle of your experience will eventually swing back up into the positive again. Patience is key, but so is gentleness . . . gentleness with yourself, and with others, and with your heart, and with the hearts of others.

Life is ultimately circular in motion. What goes up must come down, but what goes down must come up again. Be patient; you will rise to the light again.

August 14, 2014

Your brain is BIG – take care of it!

Ever consider the complexity of the human brain? It weighs just three pounds but contains over 100 billion interconnected cells (half of which are nerve cells) and controls our muscles, senses, thoughts, emotions, motivations, executive functions and more.

It’s hard to get a handle on the sheer scale of the brain’s activity — and what can happen for someone who sustains a brain injury —  but the Traumatic Brain Injury Survival Guide by Dr. Glen Johnson provides a great example by comparing the brain to the world’s telephone system:

If we took all the phones in the world and all the wires (there are over seven billion people on the planet), the number of connections and the trillions of messages per day would NOT equal the complexity or activity of a single human brain. Now let’s take a “small problem”: break every phone in Michigan and cut every wire in the state. How long would it take for the entire state (about 10 million people) to get phone service back? A week, a month, or several years? If you guessed several years, you are now beginning to see the complexity [of the brain and] of recovering from a head injury. In the example I used, Michigan residents would be without phone service while the rest of the world had phone service that worked fine. This is also true for people who have a head injury. Some parts of the brain will work fine while others are in need of repair or are slowly being reconnected.

All that to say: Take care of your noggin!! Wear a helmet, wear a seatbelt, and take adequate time to rest and recover if you do sustain a head injury. Be safe out there!

August 5, 2014

Live the whole glorious hazard

I like this passage from the memoir Traveling with Pomegranates: A Mother-Daughter Story by Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor:

There is no immunity from life — that’s what I’ve learned. I will never be the kind of person to volunteer from the audience at Cirque du Soleil, but I won’t be satisfied with being draperies either. I don’t want to miss out on what the Greeks call zoe. Life. I want to live all of it, the whole glorious hazard.

What a great way to describe life: “the whole glorious hazard.”

I want to live the whole glorious hazard, too. I want to greet each day excited about what it might bring, not worried about what may come to pass. I want to focus on what I have in life, rather than what I don’t have. I want to reach old age and still have a sparkle in my eye and a desire to try new things. I want to always have a true understanding of what zoe is because of all the zoe flowing through my body and my mind and my heart every single day.

Let’s get out there and live the hazard.