September 16, 2014

Love like you want to be loved

Thought of the moment, courtesy of American writer Mignon McLaughlin:

No one has ever loved anyone the way everyone wants to be loved.

But you can start by loving yourself the way you want someone else to love you.

September 10, 2014

THIS IS A REMINDER TO NOT BE AFRAID

Caroline R:

I love this poem by fellow blogger Alexandra Bodman; the last two phrases are especially poignant.

Originally posted on Fevered Crenellations:

sometimes i imagine myself as a force

a force of whatever i am trying to achieve

and i become it

sometimes i ask myself what i would like from others

and then i give it to myself

View original

September 9, 2014

Learn to speak your spontaneous truth

Thought for the moment:

Truth is completely spontaneous. Lies have to be taught.
~ Buckminster Fuller

Think about it: how many times has someone asked you a question about your life or your opinions or your personal goals, and you find yourself checking your thoughts before you speak, trying to catch that wave of “truth” that instantly wells up inside you and hold it inside until you’ve had chance to reframe it or water it down or distill its true meaning before you open your mouth to answer? As adults, we tend to cover up our true feelings — about people, about situations, about ourselves — for many reasons. Maybe we’re afraid of hurting or getting hurt, or we want to conform, or we mistakenly think our true passions and opinions are somehow “silly” (they’re not; they never are). Whatever the case — and whether the process is conscious or unconscious — the result is the same: we end up masking our honest opinions and emotions in layers of protective, shape-muting “verbal gauze,” and we end up being untrue to both ourselves and the world around us.

What would happen if next time you were asked a question — any question: “How are you today?” “What is your opinion on X?” “Do you want to come with me?” “You seem upset; what happened?” “Where do you want to be in one/two/five/twenty years?” — you told the truth. What if you just let the words that spontaneously well up inside you bubble out into the world, for better or worse? Any pausing you do before answering would be to make sure you’re stating your truth accurately, diplomatically and sympathetically. No need to try and suck the reality out of anything. Reality is what you want.

Scary, yes, but with time and with practice, perhaps your life would become more authentic. Perhaps the things you crave would actually start coming your way. Perhaps you would grow as a person, into a space beyond any limits that you see before you today.

September 8, 2014

This full moon, return to yourself

On the eve of the 2014 harvest moon — also a supermoon — I share the lyrics from the song “Return to Innocence” by Enigma.

In this life, follow your heart, and don’t be afraid to take a risk or two. Be well.

Don’t be afraid to be weak.
Don’t be too proud to be strong.
Just look into your heart, my friend;
That will be the return to yourself:
The return to innocence.

If you want, then start to laugh.
If you must, then start to cry.
Be yourself; don’t hide.
Just believe in destiny.
Don’t care what people say.
Just follow your own way.
Don’t give up and lose the chance
To return to innocence.

September 4, 2014

It’s never too late to find love

An excerpt from an advice column in my local newspaper:

Dear XX: I, too, am 82 years old and have been single for 23 years. A little over a year ago, I became reacquainted with a wonderful gentleman I’d met at a church 40 years ago. We will be getting married this fall. Do not despair. There is always hope. – In Love in SoCal

When it comes to love, there is always hope. Stay open, always, and never give up the search.

September 1, 2014

September challenge: Make an “I’m grateful” list

This month’s challenge comes from a quote I saw posted as part of a public participation art display in my local art gallery:

If you don’t feel grateful for what you already have, what makes you think you would be happy with more?

This September, I challenge you to make a list of all the things you are grateful for in your life RIGHT NOW. Put at least 25 items on the list; more if you want to. Then post the list in a place where you can see it before you go to bed at night and when you get up in the morning. For the rest of the month, read half the list, aloud, every night; read the other half, aloud, every morning. Add new items as the mood strikes you!

You have lots to be grateful for. LOTS. It is important to recognize this truth, and celebrate it. ❤

August 30, 2014

Credo for a life well lived

At the end of her memoir The Second Journey, author Joan Anderson shares a list of personal guidelines that she wrote to remind herself how to remain grounded, present and open to continual growth in today’s over-busy, over-achieving society. Consider the list a permission slip of sorts: YOU have the right to these things, too!

Embrace change — knowing that life is always being reconfigured.
Befriend the person you are striving to become.
Welcome new paths. Enjoy the detours.
Strive to go deeper rather than just forward.
Know that most unnecessary demands come from the unfinished parts of self.
Beware of speed. It is often one’s undoing.
Wholehearted is the way. Half-hearted will kill you.
Harness your evolvement.
Let go of what is outlived to make room for the unlived.

If I have learned nothing else, it is that the journey [of life, of self] will always be unfinished.

August 26, 2014

Be patient, my dear, for the light will shine again

Thought for the moment, courtesy of Joan Anderson’s memoir The Second Journey:

Nothing worthwhile can be hurried — not the seasons, not birth or death, the coming of day, the moving into night; not a composition, a thought, a work of art, the form of a story. Patience is what makes each experience meaningful. Finding the time to be patient is what makes a life well lived.

Sometimes life hands you some real “lemons” of a moment. All you can do during these trying times is trust that the cycle of your experience will eventually swing back up into the positive again. Patience is key, but so is gentleness . . . gentleness with yourself, and with others, and with your heart, and with the hearts of others.

Life is ultimately circular in motion. What goes up must come down, but what goes down must come up again. Be patient; you will rise to the light again.

August 14, 2014

Your brain is BIG – take care of it!

Ever consider the complexity of the human brain? It weighs just three pounds but contains over 100 billion interconnected cells (half of which are nerve cells) and controls our muscles, senses, thoughts, emotions, motivations, executive functions and more.

It’s hard to get a handle on the sheer scale of the brain’s activity — and what can happen for someone who sustains a brain injury —  but the Traumatic Brain Injury Survival Guide by Dr. Glen Johnson provides a great example by comparing the brain to the world’s telephone system:

If we took all the phones in the world and all the wires (there are over seven billion people on the planet), the number of connections and the trillions of messages per day would NOT equal the complexity or activity of a single human brain. Now let’s take a “small problem”: break every phone in Michigan and cut every wire in the state. How long would it take for the entire state (about 10 million people) to get phone service back? A week, a month, or several years? If you guessed several years, you are now beginning to see the complexity [of the brain and] of recovering from a head injury. In the example I used, Michigan residents would be without phone service while the rest of the world had phone service that worked fine. This is also true for people who have a head injury. Some parts of the brain will work fine while others are in need of repair or are slowly being reconnected.

All that to say: Take care of your noggin!! Wear a helmet, wear a seatbelt, and take adequate time to rest and recover if you do sustain a head injury. Be safe out there!

August 5, 2014

Live the whole glorious hazard

I like this passage from the memoir Traveling with Pomegranates: A Mother-Daughter Story by Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor:

There is no immunity from life — that’s what I’ve learned. I will never be the kind of person to volunteer from the audience at Cirque du Soleil, but I won’t be satisfied with being draperies either. I don’t want to miss out on what the Greeks call zoe. Life. I want to live all of it, the whole glorious hazard.

What a great way to describe life: “the whole glorious hazard.”

I want to live the whole glorious hazard, too. I want to greet each day excited about what it might bring, not worried about what may come to pass. I want to focus on what I have in life, rather than what I don’t have. I want to reach old age and still have a sparkle in my eye and a desire to try new things. I want to always have a true understanding of what zoe is because of all the zoe flowing through my body and my mind and my heart every single day.

Let’s get out there and live the hazard.

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